Field days to improve on awareness creation and increase stakeholders’ interaction and adoption of profitable innovations

Several innovations to increase crop yields and reduce the persistent yield gaps in sub-Saharan Africa have successfully been assessed, but getting them adopted by smallholder farmers has been a challenge. There is still a need to conduct on farm participatory demonstration trials to facilitate the understanding of technologies and the knowledge on how to effectively apply them, as well as showing the cost-benefit.

Several innovations to increase crop yields and reduce the persistent yield gaps in sub-Saharan Africa have successfully been assessed, but getting them adopted by smallholder farmers has been a challenge. There is still a need to conduct on farm participatory demonstration trials to facilitate the understanding of technologies and the knowledge on how to effectively apply them, as well as showing the cost-benefit.   The project conducted dissemination campaigns in the various project countries. Field days have been organized to facilitate discussion among stakeholders. For instance in May 2015, field days were organized in Mbeya region (Tanzania) for common been growers (Field photo). The discussion included participating and non-participating farmers in the demonstration trials so that they could interact. The field days were facilitated by the dissemination partner in Tanzania i.e. African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership (AFAP). Participants included not only farmers, but also stakeholders like local administration (e.g. district level) and regional agricultural research institutes (e.g. Uyole). The field days demonstrated a strong willingness of farmers to adopt improved legume technologies. The challenge has sometimes been related to the availability of the inputs despite the efforts of development partners.   Although COMPRO-II did phase out dissemination campaigns in 2016, collaboration with development partners will sustain the momentum. For example, COMPRO-II partners and the project leader are involved in a project on scaling up improved legume technologies in Tanzania (funded by the International Development Research Centre under the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund) to build on the COMPRO-II experience.

The project conducted dissemination campaigns in the various project countries. Field days have been organized to facilitate discussion among stakeholders. For instance in May 2015, field days were organized in Mbeya region (Tanzania) for common been growers (Field photo). The discussion included participating and non-participating farmers in the demonstration trials so that they could interact. The field days were facilitated by the dissemination partner in Tanzania i.e. African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership (AFAP). Participants included not only farmers, but also stakeholders like local administration (e.g. district level) and regional agricultural research institutes (e.g. Uyole). The field days demonstrated a strong willingness of farmers to adopt improved legume technologies. The challenge has sometimes been related to the availability of the inputs despite the efforts of development partners.

Although COMPRO-II did phase out dissemination campaigns in 2016, collaboration with development partners will sustain the momentum. For example, COMPRO-II partners and the project leader are involved in a project on scaling up improved legume technologies in Tanzania (funded by the International Development Research Centre under the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund) to build on the COMPRO-II experience.